It's MAY, y'all. Here are some notable dates in May. Feel free to add your own in the comments. As it's now May, let's take a minute and think about all the cool things we have to look forward to. (this may not be applicable in some countries)

May 1. Today is May Day. We are halfway from first day of Spring to the Summer Solstice.

May 1. Today is also World Lyme Day. Not for Margaritas.

May 2. Holocaust Remembrance Day.

May 2. National Day of Prayer. National Day of Prayer is an annual holiday that serves to encourage Americans to pray, meditate and repent. It is also used to draw awareness to prayer and religious beliefs.

May 3. St James TL / St Philip History. This Observance celebrates the lives of Saint Philip and James the Lesser, two of the 12 disciples of Jesus Christ.
The apostle Philip is the patron saint of hat makers and pastry chefs. He's also the patron saint of Luxembourg and Uruguay. He is famous for being one of Jesus' first disciples. James, sometimes called James the Lesser, is known as the writer of the epistle of James in the Bible. He was bishop of Jerusalem in the early church. He is the patron saint of pharmacists, hat makers, and the dying.

May 4. May the 4th be with you.

May 4. Kentucky Derby. The Kentucky Derby is the most popular and oldest horse race in the world. The race is a 1.25-mile long, Grade I stake horse race for three-year-old thoroughbreds on a dirt track. It is held annually at Churchill Downs racetrack in Louisville, Kentucky. The Kentucky Derby, run on the first Saturday in May of every year, is the first leg of the elusive Triple Crown races. It is followed by the Preakness Stakes two weeks later in Baltimore, Maryland and the Belmont Stakes, 3 weeks after the Preakness in Elmont, New York.
Meriweather Clark founded the Kentucky Derby, which was first held in 1875. Since then, the Derby has become a day of luxury and fashion and celebrities are often in attendance.

May 5. Cinco de Mayo. Cinco de Mayo is a celebration of the Mexican Army's victory over France during the Franco-Mexican War. During Mexico's war with France, the US was engaged in its Civil War. Cinco de Mayo celebrates the Mexican victory at the Battle of Puebla. This battle was a significant turning point for the US as well. The French were US Confederate Army supporters. During the Battle of Puebla, their attention became so focused on the battle with Mexico that the US Union Army forces were able to advance and gain significant ground. It is considered a minor holiday inside Mexico however, in the US, Cinco de Mayo not only celebrates the victory at the Battle of Puebla, but also serves as a celebration of the culture and heritage of the Mexican people.

May 6. Ramadan (Arabic: رمضان‎ ) is the holiest month in the Islamic calendar, during which, for a period of thirty days, Muslims abstain from eating, and drinking from sunrise to sunset. Muslims do this because it is a pillar of Islam, and obligatory for everyone. In other words, God decreed this entire month holy for Muslims so that they can increase their remembrance of life after death. Muslims also abstain from all bad deeds and habits, like smoking, swearing, backbiting, and disrespectfulness. Muslims reflect upon themselves, their religion, and the characteristics of God. Fasting during Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. Fasting and abstaining from bad habits teaches Muslims self-control, humility, and generosity. Ramadan is a time for charity, family, and good deeds. Muslims fast because they believe it is vital for spiritual health. Unlike the fast of Ashurah, the fasts of Ramadan are declared mandatory by God because like salah (praying towards Mecca), fasting helps Muslims maintain spiritual and physical health.
The month of Ramadan begins when the new moon of Ramadan is sighted and ends when the new moon of Sha'ban is sighted. Muslims also believe that devils are chained up during Ramadan.

May 7. National Teaches Day. Give your favorite teacher an apple. As of May 2012, there were 950,440 teachers, teaching approximately 58 million students in US elementary and secondary schools.

May 8. Yom HaZikaron. Israeli Memorial Day.

May 9. Yom HaAtzma'ut. Israelís Independence Day. Israel declared independence on May 14th, 1948. This was only a few hours before the British Mandate of Palestine was to draw to an end.

May 12. Motherís Day. Donít forget her flowers.

May 18. Armed Forces Day. Armed Forces Day is a day to recognize members of the Armed Forces that are currently serving.

May 22. International Day for Biological Diversity. The International Day for Biological Diversity aims to raise awareness and understanding of biological diversity and issues surrounding it. The day also serves to highlight possible strategies to protect biodiversity, which refers to the variety of life on the planet. Today, habitats are degrading and leading to a reduction in biodiversity, a problem that directly affects human well-being, poverty reduction and global sustainable development.
The International Day for Biological Diversity was proclaimed in December of 2000 by the United Nations General Assembly. It is celebrated annually on May 22, a day that commemorates the adoption of the Convention on Biological Diversity in 1992.

May 23. Lag BíOmer. The Omer (Hebrew: ל״ג בעומר‎‎‎‎) refers to the 49 days between Passover and Shavuot.

May 24. National Brother Day. National Brother Day seeks to celebrate brothers, the male sibling and their contributions to each and every one of their families. It seeks to celebrate the bond between brothers and its significance.

May 27. Memorial Day. Memorial Day is a US holiday to honor and remember those who died while serving in the military. It is a day to raise our awareness about the Nationís freedom and the price for this freedom. Every year U.S. soldiers and their families pay that price. Memorial Day is a day for reverence and honoring of those who gave their lives defending the Nation and its values. In 1971, Congress declared it a national holiday. It also marks the unofficial start to the summer season.

May 28. National Burger Day. (I thought this was Memorial Day)Ö National Burger Day is a day of appreciation for hamburgers. The term hamburger is derived from the city of Hamburg, Germany, where beef from Hamburg cows was minced and formed into patties to make Hamburg steaks.
The origin of the hamburger in the United States remains debated, although most claim that the hamburger originated between 1880 and 1900. Since then, this beef patty in a bun has become a global staple of the fast-food diet and the backyard cookout. In recent years, these traditional beef patties have been transformed to include other meat and vegetarian options such as, bison, ostrich, deer, chicken, turkey, veggies, tofu and bean patties. National Hamburger Day is celebrated annually on May 28th.

May 30. Ascension. Ascension commemorates the day that Jesus ascended into Heaven (Acts 1:1-11) after spending 40 days appearing to his disciples after his resurrection. The disciples thought Jesus was going to restore the earth to the Kingdom of Heaven, but instead, as he promised to send the Holy Spirit to give them power, he ascended into Heaven and disappeared in a cloud.
Ascension is the 40th day after Easter, celebrated on the sixth Sunday of the Easter season in Protestant churches and on the 40th day after Easter in Roman Catholic churches.

May 31. Lailatul Qadr. Laylatul-Qadr (Arabic: لیلة القدر‎), The Night of Power, is the holiest night in the Islamic calendar. Muslims believe that on this night, the Quran was sent down from the heavens to the Earth. The exact date of this night is unknown but occurs on one of the last ten odd nights of Ramadan (21st, 23rd, 25th, 27th, or 29th). According to Islamic tradition, Muslims who stay up on this holy night worshipping God will have all their sins forgiven. Furthermore, they will be granted as many good deeds as though they had worshipped continuously for one thousand months (83.3 years).

May 31. World No Tobacco Day. In 1987, the World Health Organization established World No Tobacco Day in an effort to draw attention to the risks of tobacco use and move towards safer and better public health for all. Since then, World No Tobacco Day has evolved into an important annual event that generates awareness for other tobacco related issues such as illegal trade, secondhand smoke and tobacco control.